≡ Menu

September 2015

At Altmetric we’ve always tracked the online attention for items with a scholarly identifier, no matter what subject they might be. Despite this, the majority of the attention we’ve seen to this published research so far tends to be for articles or data relating to public health or scientific breakthroughs. Why is this? Partly, we suspect, it’s because these are matters of broad public interest, and the primary outputs of researchers working in those disciplines tend to be academic articles, which then get then published in a journal, and, if deemed high profile enough, promoted further by the publisher as well as the author(s).

In the previous blog post in this series, we briefly talked about how researchers can reap the benefits of making all their research outputs available online. The principle behind this post is to explore the questions around “tracking other outputs” in a little more detail.

So far in this blog series, we’ve talked about the insights you can get from Altmetric data, and how researchers can use the data in CVs and grant applications. The aim of this post is to talk about best practices for sharing your research online, and how to use different online platforms for networking and discovery purposes.

A couple of months ago, at the London Book Fair, Springer and Altmetric launched a new platform to measure book impact: Bookmetrix. But what is Bookmetrix exactly, and what can data can you see? Read on to learn more.

Over the past few weeks we’ve been talking about what altmetrics are, what Altmetric.com data can show you, and some ideas for how researchers might use it. In this post you’ll find some real-life use cases featuring researchers who have gone ahead and done just that.